Did you catch today’s Insurgent trailer?

USA Today Books posted an exclusive trailer for Insurgent (Divergent #2) by Veronica Roth today.

Mark your calendars! Insurgent is out May 1st!

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Ms. Roth also gave USA Today an interview:

What do you feel fans’ biggest questions are going into the sequel, and are you answering them?

I’m answering some of them but not all of them. People want to know more about Divergence so some of that is answered and some of it is left open in the second one. And people want to know about the other factions, and you find out more about them. Of course, many people were panicked about the possibility of a love triangle, which is funny. There isn’t one, so I reassured them about that.

Love triangles do seem to be popular these days.

Yeah, they are and I think they can be great. But Tris is just not the kind of character who would be divided in that way. For me, it was always clear that there was not going to be a love triangle for her.

There were some sacrifices by folks at the end of Divergent. Will Tris be in an emotional place as Insurgent opens?

The first book ended with her on an adrenaline rush: She doesn’t really deal with what happened in Book 1. Book 2 starts right when the adrenaline rush is gone. She basically deals with it for the rest of the book, and it’s one of her biggest struggles is to get over what she did. It’s sort of like the first blow was struck at the end of the first book, and in the second book everything just explodes.

Do you feel a kind of adrenaline rush yourself as you get into weaving the story as much as the characters do?

Yeah, definitely. I’m terrified of heights, which is something Tris and I do not have in common. I know exactly what it’s like to stand on top of a tall building or in a high place and look down and go, “Ohhhh my God.” I try to get into that place every time I write a scene like that. And definitely when I write the action scenes, I get overheated and my heart goes really fast. I get very involved.

Will readers see new and different parts of this dystopian Chicago?

One of the wonderful things about the second book is that Tris becomes more free to explore the city she lives in, whereas in the first one she had to stick with her faction. Her experience with the world was limited, and it becomes wider in the second book.

Was J.K. Rowling an influence in creating this world?

I love Harry Potter. I’m a huge nerd — I would dress up if I could. I don’t know if she’s really an influence because it’s not really the same kind of thing I’m writing. Her attention to detail and world building is definitely something to aspire to. The world of Harry Potter is so intricate — I don’t know if I’ll ever get there, but that part is definitely inspiring.

In just under a year, you’ve released your first book, optioned your first movie and built up a sizable fan base. That seems like a lot happening at a very young age.

It’s really nuts. [Laughs] I’m still bewildered. I just try to keep my head down and keep writing. All of these things are super exciting but what I really love is the writing, so I’m happy to do it as a career. That’s been the best part of it.

The roughest part?

When you’re a writer, you hear your internal critic, and that’s really hard to get over. And then sometimes you hear critiques from classmates and stuff. But when a book comes out, it’s just hundreds of opinions and you have to learn to separate out the ones you want to listen to or figure out many you want to listen to. That was a little difficult to navigate. I always appreciate people’s opinions, but sometimes I have to take a step back and remember why I’m writing and what I want to do with it. Shutting out the voices is difficult but it’s been good for me.

When the movie treatment came up, was there any part of you that wanted to do the screenplay yourself?

You know, not really. Someone said, “Do you want to try and do that?” And I was just like, “No!” I don’t know how to write a screenplay and I’m really partial to books. I thought it would be fun to see where someone else takes it, and obviously that’s a little scary because you’re not sure if they’re going to take it in a good place or not. I’ve met Evan the screenwriter, and he’s a really great guy and I trust him.

Vampires were big a few years ago, now dystopian futures are hot in the YA world. Why is that?

A dystopian setting dramatizes in a really interesting way the struggles of the average adolescent. You’re starting to think about love and relationships — Delirium by Lauren Oliver is a book about love being outlawed and finding it in the midst of that society just makes the whole struggle more intense than the average teenager’s. They all kind of do that: They create this world where the struggle that a teenager is having feels like the end of the world, and are actually like the end of the world. [Laughs] There’s something really perfect about that. It honors what teenagers are experiencing because your emotions are so powerful at that age and everybody’s telling you to kind of chill out. But the dystopian books are saying, “No! It’s important! It’s a big deal!” And I like that.

You’re only 23, so you’re not far from the ages of the characters you’re writing. Does that help?

It helps and it hurts. I felt very much like an adult in my own mind when I was 16, and so I never really feel tempted to talk down to them because we’re peers. [Laughs] We’re more peers than me and other people who are authors. I just try to talk to them like they’re exactly my age. That helps, but it’s also a little hard because a lot of writing is having perspective and a mastery over the age you’re talking about. I don’t know how developed that is my own mind, so I have to fight with that a little bit.

Do the Hunger Games comparisons bother you?

The Hunger Games is pretty fantastic, so I always get a little scared when people make those comparisons because I think, “Well, I never tried to do that…” And it’s so good that it’s a little daunting to see those comparisons out there. But at the same time, it’s been pretty incredible what it’s done for the genre and for my book’s visibility. Also, if you’re going to be compared to something, it might as well be The Hunger Games because it’s really awesome. At least it’s not something I didn’t like.

In what Divergent faction would teenage Veronica Roth have been placed?

I think I would have been in Candor at that age. I tried to be as honest as possible and I’m sure that got me into trouble a lot of the time, because I also wasn’t very nice as a teenager. [Laughs] I kind of grew out of that.

And where would you put yourself now?

Dauntless. Not because I’m a badass and I can jump off trains or something, but because I think bravery is pretty important.

You’re not a fan of heights so you do not skydive for fun. Do you read other books while you’re writing or have some other escape from the keyboard?

I do read a lot — young adult books a lot of the time to see what my peers are doing, and adult books. I just finished The Fault in Our Stars by John Green, which is really meaningful and powerful. I work out, I try to escape that way. Movies. The usual boring stuff.

Will this current series just be a trilogy, or do you feel like it could grow to be a quadrilogy or spin off other books?

I never rule anything out, but I’m sure that Tris’ story will only be three books. Right now, that’s the plan.

Do you have a title for the third book?

No, we don’t have one yet. We have a few ideas.

What are the chances it will end with “ent”?

[Laughs] I think it has to at this point. You gotta have “ent.”

source: USA Today Books

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About Celeste

mom to 2 girls, wife, huge dog lover, vegetarian, book lover...and I have a ridic celeb crush on Alexander Skarsgård

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